Hot answers tagged

10

I think it would be on topic because they are employed (at least in this instance) for the purpose of a space launch.


9

I agree, to take that wording literally would wipe out hundreds of interesting questions about space exploration history. (Unless, I guess, the questioner is writing a book about space exploration)


8

There are a couple of problems here: No one is required to sacrifice their time to explain things to you. Of course, getting further information can be necessary, but it absolutely doesn't have to come from a specific person. When someone takes an action for a reason that is not clear, it can be difficult sometimes for others to fill in the gaps, but that's ...


6

I'll add a contra-position answer to permit voting. I think any questions in the Space Exploration Stack Exchange should make it clear how they are related explicitly to the exploration of space, particularly by the use of space craft. If we were to extend the remit to all topics that relate to knowledge of space, such as celestial mechanics, we end up ...


5

You're right, I should have vtc with a comment explaining why. Done.


5

Since it seems people are hesitant to stake out an answer, I would like to offer a suggestion. I didn't want to offer my own opinion because I wanted to give the community a chance to decide, but instead of offering an opinion I'll give an estimation of what the community wants based on what types of questions were closed. With the exception of the recently ...


5

There is an identify-this-object tag for just this sort of thing and it's quite active and well-written questions are generally well-received. Your question should contain basic information about the photo including at least the approximate location, time and date and any other details you have. I see that you do have estimated time and location so this ...


5

The last comment there about shopping questions being general SE no-no's is pretty conclusive, as is asking for people's opinions. Both of these off-topic reasons are fairly self-evident. It looks exactly like a promotion to me btw. It doesn't matter if it is or isn't, because one can't be sure, if it looks like one, then it's probably off-topic.


4

What topics should be revised, studied, or well understood, prior to the course? Have you been able to apply what you learnt? To what sort of project or system/subsystem have you applied, or will apply, your course knowledge? If you had to pay for this course yourself for professional development (and hopefully it's tax-deductible in your jurisdiction), ...


4

The relevant bit here isn't whether it's a weapon or not. It's whether the question has any relevance to space exploration. The question on how long till the ICBM hits is entirely off topic. It's also not a good question anyway - it has a couple of flawed assumptions, the time given was a rough guide anyway, and simple maths gives you the answer (as does ...


4

I will argue that anyone capable of building an ICBM already has the capability to figure out basic orbital mechanics. Therefore, who will such a question ban actually protect? To compare it to the exiting off-topic ruling of dangerous amateur experiments, that one protects people who can find a way to injure themselves given a litre of hydrazine, which is ...


4

The practical problems bit was placed for Stack Overflow. It doesn't apply to every site. Very few questions on this site are facing real life problems, and that doesn't apply to this site.


3

I'm against preemptive block-banning any question on the military use of space. We'd have to remove all questions about Space Force or military satellite launches, and I can't imagine a tighter boundary that can be easily drawn either. There's plenty of publicly available information on space-based weapons and questions about that should remain on-topic. I ...


3

We encountered this very question on Security Stack Exchange. Almost every use of tools or techniques a company could use to discover weaknesses in their environment that need fixing are exactly the same tools an attacker would use, so many questions posted could be for good or evil. And in many countries, assisting attackers can come under misuse of ...


2

I agree with uhoh's answer that each question should be considered on its own merits, rather than outright banning a category. However, I think there are a few points worth adding. For a question under consideration, imagine taking all of the space exploration related aspects out of the question. Then ask yourself, "is this still a question that can ...


2

It was previously ruled as on topic (technically ruled as "not strictly off topic"), but this is definitely one of those borderline cases. I think we need a new meta question about what is on/off topic in regards to celestial mechanics, and the result of that discussion needs to be a final determination on this question. If the new rules decided make it off ...


2

This should be on topic. It's a bit borderline, but would fall under the realm of planetary science and orbital mechanics, both of which are valid subjects here. The same question would also be on topic at Physics, but that shouldn't preclude it from being on topic here as well.


2

Topicality This is addressed in @called2voyage's answer but I'll add the following: I'm the author of the linked comment which includes: ...so I think it's a great follow-up question. Please consider just posting it as a new one and linking back here for background. It would only need to be a sentence or two max, and could use the same tags" and the ...


1

While it sounds great to allow questions that pertain to astronomy (celestial mechanics, to be precise) and do not have an explicit connection to space exploration, I really think this is calls for a lot of ambiguity. There are highly upvoted questions from the past which have no reference to space exploration, but that hardly tells us if allowing it on the ...


1

I strongly agree with SF's answer that questions should be more science than fiction. However, I can think of one allowable exception. There are certain persons who are considered significant contributors to spaceflight, but have also expressed their visions of what the future of space exploration could be. Wehrner von Braun and Elon Musk come to mind, ...


1

There is no contradiction between upvotes and votes to close. It happened multiple times that I casted both an upvote and a vote to close on the same question. Upvoting is for good questions. A question can be interesting, well researched, and fun, but also off-topic. In this case I will upvote and vote to close. Perhaps not if it's blatantly off-topic, ...


1

I initiated the closure, so I think I should post the original reasoning I gave, along with the points on which I feel convinced that the question in question should remain closed. I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is an astronomy question, specifically a celestial mechanics question. And our help center clearly states that ...


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