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I want to ask a bit of a fun challenge question. It involves some hefty math and probably a lot of speculation. My worry is there is no clear answer. In short, I want to ask how much ice from Europa would cost, per pound, if we were to import it.

If not here, is there another place that would be better suited for it?

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  • $\begingroup$ I wonder if worldbuilding would be more appropriate, where speculative science and magnitude-of-order answers are more welcome? $\endgroup$ – Mikey May 30 '15 at 22:05
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My worry is there is no clear answer.

Then no. Questions should have a definitive answer and should not be primarily opinion based or solicit prolonged discussion. OK, granted, sometimes it can't be expected of those asking questions to anticipate these problems, but in your case, you seem to already suspect it wouldn't be a great fit for us. From what little you let on about it here, I also suspect it would be too broad. But I'd have to see it to make my mind up.

As for challenges, well, maybe. But it would somewhat stretch our Q&A format thin and you'd have to set exact rules within it that would still fit it. I personally don't like the idea. All questions should be challenging to answer to the best of one's abilities, and to also pay it forward, anyway. If that's not the case, then questions might be too trivial, with readily available answer a simple web search away, and with it failing our prior research requirement.

But don't take my opinion on it as a final ruling on the matter. Perhaps you could make it work. Just make sure you keep your question on-topic, that it won't require too long or opinion based answers, will fit our Q&A format with best answers being highest rated, most useful answer (if any) accepted, and that the whole thread won't go stale as soon as you do that. In other words:

How do I ask a good question?

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Search, and research

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So if you think you can satisfy all these requirements, which are otherwise fairly simple to follow if one abides to the Q&A format of ours and asks honest questions, then go for it.

If not here, is there another place that would be better suited for it?

I don't know. You could try in our main chat room. Or here in our meta, where it wouldn't be unheard of that we setup some fun challenges on occasion, for some of which yours truly might have been guilty of. But our main site probably wouldn't be a suitable place for it. And I can't think of any other Stack Exchange site. But do check.

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  • $\begingroup$ The only place I can think of is possibly the math stack, since it is quite a bit of calculation, but also requires some research on the part of space travel in 2015. $\endgroup$ – Premier Bromanov May 13 '15 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ Well, Europa ice has one big attribute that makes it valuable to a customer: The fact that it's from Europa. Exclusivity sells, especially to rich people lol $\endgroup$ – Premier Bromanov May 13 '15 at 15:24
  • $\begingroup$ That's what I was thinking $\endgroup$ – Premier Bromanov May 13 '15 at 17:45

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