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Infographics can be quite convenient sometimes, collating information from multiple sources and/or describing complex concepts in easy to understand and often visually pleasing way. Problem is, there is many of them and I find it difficult to remember where I saw some that I might later want to use as a reference, so I thought it couldn't go amiss to have a nice thread dedicated to them all of its own.

Where to find them?

If you're interested in something specific that isn't yet posted below in the answers, then a Google Image Search with relevant keywords, adding "infographic" among them and filtering search results to display only large images, e.g. q=space+exploration+infographic&tbm=isch&isz:lt,islt:4mp for images larger than 4 megapixels. Many space exploration infographics are also collected on various external pages, for example:

And so on, and links to more of them could be found by a normal web search. Please post those infographics you find most interesting below, each in a new answer.

How to post?

Image files can be absolutely huge (poster-size), and since I expect we'll eventually add many and don't want to cause problems to those that are bandwidth starved, I propose we post here thumbnails that would link to wherever they're externally hosted, or if that external location is at risk of being changed or forgotten about ("link rot"), perhaps even better if we upload them here using image uploader, and then reuse their new location for the link for the thumbnail image. If you'll have problems with this, don't worry, I or someone else can edit your submissions for you.

So...

Post the best infographics that are space exploration related, preferably as thumbnails (or whatever size you deem befitting for the purpose of cataloging them here) that are linked to their poster size, or the highest resolution that they come in. If you can, also post short description of what they are supposed to represent, when they were last updated, and don't forget to include the link to your source. If you find some that you thought are good but aren't in English, then if you can translate them in the post, they should still be acceptable, and perhaps I even translate the image itself. As long as that's possible without utterly ruining its design, of course. That's it. Get cracking! :P

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    $\begingroup$ Note: you can simply append m to the end of an imgur URL to get an insta-placeholder, i.e. .../b1l2c3m.png shows a small version of .../b1l2c3.png. $\endgroup$ – Undo Jan 7 '14 at 16:07
  • $\begingroup$ Great question, belongs on the air in primetime (on space.stackexchange.com). $\endgroup$ – Bob Stein Mar 9 '14 at 15:44
  • $\begingroup$ I thought you'd say that. But it's such good content to be hidden away in this attic... $\endgroup$ – Bob Stein Mar 9 '14 at 16:38

10 Answers 10

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Bryan Christie, Harold Clenet: Missions to Mars

Infographic date: February 22, 2013

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Description:

Harold Clenet updated Bryan Christie original Missions to Mars infographic that was prepared for IEEE Spectrum in 2007, but the updated version now includes more recent data on Mars exploration missions and adds a graph for the volume of data that has been acquired by the different space probes and is available via Mars Orbital Data Explorer.

Links:

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NASA: The Future of American Human Spaceflight

Infographic date: February 6, 2012

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Description:

NASA is embarking on a new era of space exploration in which humans will travel deeper into the solar system than ever before. The International Space Station is the centerpiece for space operations. Serving as a test bed for research and new technologies, the space station is a steppingstone toward future exploration destinations. The commercial industry will transport cargo and eventually crew to the space station while NASA focuses on developing the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, Space Launch System, and advanced exploration systems that will enable a sustainable human presence to destinations such as the moon, near-Earth asteroids and Mars.

Links:

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XKCD Up Goer Five

enter image description here

click for higher resolution

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Michael Bullerdick, Julie Rossman: Where Are They Now

Checking In on Earth’s 25 Active Missions

Infographic date: January 22, 2014

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Description:

From twin satellites photographing the sun in 360° to rovers on Mars to a ‘70s-era probe passing out of the heliosphere and into interstellar space, mankind has more than two dozen currently active spacecraft outside simple Earth orbit. We created this infographic to showcase where all Earth’s interplanetary explorers are today, and what they're up to.

Links:

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  • $\begingroup$ Update: LADEE suicided recently. $\endgroup$ – Loren Pechtel Apr 24 '14 at 3:08
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US Space Travel: A Timeline of Manned NASA Flights

Infographic date: March 13, 2012

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Description:

Between 1961 and 2011, the U.S. launched 166 manned missions to space. This infographic, created by the artists at mgmt. design, depicts every last one of them. Some things worth paying attention to in this chart include the short lifespan of each program relative to that of the Space Shuttle, and the gaps in spaceflight that inevitably occur in the months and years following a disaster, or a shift from one program to the next.

Links:

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T. McCall, M. Orcutt: Space over Time / History of Space Launches

Infographic date: August 23, 2011

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Description:

This graphic groups payloads by the nationality of the owner. A satellite, a capsule of cosmonauts, or a deep-space probe would each count as one payload. The data, which run through July 2011, were drawn from hundreds of sources, including space agency documents, academic journals, and interviews. They were compiled by Jonathan ­McDowell, an ­astrophysicist at the Harvard-­Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and author of Jonathan’s Space Report, a newsletter that tracks launches.

Links:

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The History of Animals in Space

Infographic Date: April 12, 2013

The History of Animals in Space Infographic

Description:

As long as there have been attempts at space exploration, animals have been involved. This infographic created by Karl Tate of Space.com shows the animals launched into space by different countries from 1947 to 1996 (with a brief mention of the Bion mission resuming in 2013).

Links:

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  • $\begingroup$ Any still alive? $\endgroup$ – Bob Stein Mar 9 '14 at 15:29
  • $\begingroup$ @BobStein-VisiBone Some of the animals in this section are probably still alive. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Mar 10 '14 at 13:24
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Kim Orr: NASA Deep Space Network

Celebrating 50 Years of Communication and Discovery

Infographic date: unknown, recent

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Description:

The Deep Space Network is our connection to space. Consisting of giant antennas positioned at 120-degree intervals around the world for a complete view of the sky, it is the largest and most sensitive spacecraft communication network in existence. Since 1963, it has directed NASA's intrepid explorers on their journeys to the planets and all the way to the edge of our solar system, capturing their sights, sounds and discoveries in its parabolic embrace and sharing them with the world.

Links:

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Driving Distances on Mars and the Moon

driving distances on Mars and the Moon

Description:

The total distance covered by all extra-terrestrial land vehicles, as of July 28th, 2014. Opportunity completed a marathon (42.195 km) on March 18th, 2015.

Links: NASA Long-Lived Mars Opportunity Rover Sets Off-World Driving Record

Wikipedia image page

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Saturn V (non-Up-Goer version)

Infographic date: November 9, 2012

enter image description here

Link: NASA's Mighty Saturn V Moon Rocket Explained at Space.com

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