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I have experience of three space explorations without spacecraft.

On two different days I traveled to a very old building{Two times the greater breadth, and height than a highrise building].there were many roads, but I could not locate which one leads to the lift or elevator that goes downwards, that's the end of exploration.

I experience exactly the same on another day too.

The third experience is onboard an airplane of KLM royal dutch airlines or BRITISH AIRWAYS. The airplane crossed many airports. The cabins for sitting were full of passengers.
I left my cabin and began to pace to and fro. On my way, I found one airport which seemed to be of Nagaland, INDIA.
At last, fearfully I searched for the gate, I found the exit gate of our own flat.

my question is that and I would like to know -can these experiences be called space exploration experiences?
In all the cases I was half asleep in my flat. My two exploration experiences are below 100 KM altitude. The third experience, which was in the Airplane above 100 km altitude.

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    $\begingroup$ Even if the question was on-topic I'm afraid it would be accepted poorly here. Why? The topic is based only on subjective personal experience, as I see. Psychological studies and experiments taught us that we should be very careful and sceptical with subjective experience if it isn't supported by objective and verifyable evidence. Stackexchange topics are expected to be evidence-based. If you want to ask "what it was" - you can try psychology.stackexchange.com but I'm not sure you will get answers you like. If you want just to share your experience - maybe some exoteric sites will help... $\endgroup$
    – Heopps
    Sep 21 '20 at 10:15
  • $\begingroup$ When a dead man appears on the earth again again again.Are is accomplishments thrice or four times more than an ordinary man. if he is scientifically guided by groups of experts in this subject? user-37920 $\endgroup$
    – user37920
    Sep 22 '20 at 9:24
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Can a question be asked about space explorations without space craft?

Yes, but it depends what "space" means exactly.

The space in this site's title refers to the area that's above 100 km altitude. See Kármán line.

update: but as pointed out in the comments, that might not be crystal clear, so it's possible to understand the exploratory nature of your question!

There are several questions about "space walking" which is really floating in a life support space suit outside of a spacecraft. Some would claim that that suit becomes a spacecraft since the occupant is sealed inside it and their environment and very life is sustained by it.

There are even a few questions about reentring the atmosphere in some kind of glide suit, or what happens if you are not in a suit and exposed to space.

However

The scenarios you've mentioned don't sound like they were above the Kármán line at all, so any questions related to those experiences would be considered off-topic, and quickly closed.

For more information:

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    $\begingroup$ "For this site, space is defined as the area that's above 100 km altitude", just curious, where is this actually specified? $\endgroup$ Sep 21 '20 at 9:29
  • $\begingroup$ @SE-stopfiringthegoodguys hmm...That's a good question! I've made an adjustment to the wording, but feel free to adjust it further. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 21 '20 at 9:39
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Questions that have nothing to do with spacecraft but are about planetary science, like understanding Mars as a planet, are on topic. We have also decided that rockets are on topic, even if they don't fly in to space. And I would even say space suits are likely considered on topic, for things like Alan Eustace's jump from 41 km high, although not for terrestrial use for things like dangerous disease management.

What you are describing, however, would not really be on topic. Out of body experiences, even if they happened to be in space, are not really on topic here. Also just flying in an airplane isn't on topic, unless that airplane very specifically has to do with rockets, like the White Knight.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you add a link that supports "We have also decided that rockets are on topic, even if they don't fly in to space." I agree in principle with your statement; rockets don't need to cross the Karman line before we ask a question about them, but it appears to be in dissonance with this answer unless clarified or otherwise supported with evidence of such decision. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 23 '20 at 3:53
  • $\begingroup$ One motive I have for asking is that I think that at least some questions about ICBMs proper (not only the ones converted to launch to orbit vehicles) and other space-related weapons space should be on-topic, thought there's a small group (the "close-cabal", see deleted answers there) that doesn't like them and feels they shouldn't be allowed to be asked or answered by anybody else. I'm asking as research for a future meta question about those. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 23 '20 at 3:54
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    $\begingroup$ I've tried to find the old post, and failed to for some reason... Still, the decision was made when the site was quite young that hobby rockets were considered on topic, but we have never really done so. It's probably a reasonable question to ask if we should still allow them. As for ICBMs, well, most of them reach space, so... $\endgroup$
    – PearsonArtPhoto Mod
    Sep 23 '20 at 11:39
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What is on-topic here are question about spaceflight and the exploration of outer space by humans (even when done remotely through probes), with some leeway as to what exactly outer space is (the Karmán line is a good guideline). This also includes questions about the sun and the bodies in the solar system.

If you have such a question, ask away.

But if you explore an abandoned highrise in your dreams and explore it, thats not the kind of exploration that is on-topic here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Questions about large spaces on Earth are occasionally on-topic as well; What did NASA Vehicle Assembly Building's “weather” look like? Did it really have clouds? Did it rain? :-) $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 23 '20 at 3:57
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh And that is still a question about outer space exploration - the building is used for that and wouldn't exist otherwise. Similarly, other facilities on earth that support space exploration like tracking stations etc. are all on topic as well. So yeah. But if it doesn't have to do with the exploration of outer space, then its not on-topic. $\endgroup$
    – Polygnome
    Sep 23 '20 at 6:38

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