3
$\begingroup$

Operation Fishbowl was a 1962 series of nuclear-weapon tests involving the launching of nuclear warheads into space using rockets and detonating them there, basically to see what would happen.

Given that these tests involved launching things into space on top of rockets, are questions about Fishbowl on-topic here, or are they disqualified by dint of the identity of the things on top of the rockets and the reasons for launching them into space?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I'd think of it more like "is this question a better fit for X, Y or Z?" E.G. would it have been better on Physics SE? Probably not, it's not discussing physics. Astronomy? Nope. History? If you're only interested in answers from history buffs. Space? Yeah, seems good because: A. It passes the Karman line. B. It's not physics, astronomy, history or other SE specific. C. You may actually find someone from NASA who was involved in it or knew something about it. $\endgroup$ – Magic Octopus Urn Jul 9 at 18:55
5
$\begingroup$

Space is space! In addition to the exploration of space we have well-used tags on space-related activities such as (clickable links):

and even

The linked Wikipedia article Operation Fishbowl says:

Test type: high-altitude rocket (30–80 km), space rocket (> 80 km)

For example, Starfish Prime was at about 400 km.

I am therefore absolutely certain that a question about Operation Fishbowl is 100% on-topic.

Go for it!

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Also icbm. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jul 4 at 22:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @DrSheldon excellent, thanks! updated. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 4 at 22:04
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Future question writers should note: This meta-answer illustrates the importance of checking for existing tags, and adding the appropriate tags to the submitted question. As uhoh points out, it supports the validity of the question. In this case, Sean eventually submitted his question with appropriate tags, and it was well-received. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jul 5 at 13:04

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .