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I am pondering asking a question on main which could turn out to be overly broad in scope. Below is the question for reference:

Title: Human-rating the Saturn V using modern standards

Question:
Would a complete Apollo-Saturn stack (like e.g. AS-506) be human-rated according to the latest human-rating process (NPR 8705.2C) of NASA?

If not, what are the biggest show-stoppers?

This question was prompted by an answer by geoffc to Why are the very reliable rockets Atlas V and Ariane V not rated for human flight?, especially the following part:

Thing is, Soyuz does not meet it, yet has flown how many hundreds of manned flights (And 1700 total flights for the booster). [...] The Shuttle would not meet the standards either. Not sure about Apollo/Saturn V (and NASA would probably very much like people NOT to ask that question, I suspect.)

If the answer turns out to be yes, then the question and answer would be extremely broad. I suspect there isn't a systematic study done, so an answer would have to list how the Saturn V complies to every part of the specification. That is insane.

But I strongly suspect the answer is no. In that case, answers could be very focused, it is enough to identify one or a few items that are violated. This means an answer could be quite limited in scope. But it would also invite multiple answers each listing a different violation, without having one clearly correct answer (if there are multiple violations)

Would this question be overly broad? If so, how could it be made more focused while keeping the gist of it?

An alternative version of this question I came up with is the following:

Title: Human-rating the Saturn V using modern standards

Question:
This answer by geoffc to Why are the very reliable rockets Atlas V and Ariane V not rated for human flight?, suggests that Saturn V would likely not have been human-rated under todays human-rating process (NPR 8705.2C):

Thing is, Soyuz does not meet it, yet has flown how many hundreds of manned flights (And 1700 total flights for the booster). [...] The Shuttle would not meet the standards either. Not sure about Apollo/Saturn V (and NASA would probably very much like people NOT to ask that question, I suspect.)

What major points would prevent a complete Apollo-Saturn stack (like e.g. AS-506) from being human-rated using todays standard?

The problem is that this wording pre-supposes that the Saturn V does not pass this standard. Its a reasonable guess, but not a certainty, and "major points" is subjective in nature (what constitutes a major, what a minor obstacle?).

Is this question a good fit for Space SE, if so, what version? If not, how can it be made more narrow to fit? Or is this just too broad in scope for us to tackle?

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    $\begingroup$ I predict that either version would fly without any major problem. It might pick up a lone, drive-by "too broad" vote, but I don't think there would be many follow-ons. But having answers here would allow you to cite them if any of said activity started. $\endgroup$ – uhoh May 23 at 11:45
  • $\begingroup$ I think either version is fine; the answer would easily fit in one post. A lone voter might flag it as opinion-based because it's a "what would happen today" question, but we've had plenty of those questions already. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon May 24 at 17:07

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