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1) Maximum height for a Mars Balloon? Actual duplicate

2) How high could a weather balloon be used on Mars without rupturing? When the same question is asked twice on the same day, Where do I look for an exact timestamp? Which one of these balloons questions on Mars was written?

Updated: I did not realize that hovering over the time stamp gives you the exact time.

Side question and Update: Question 1 was in fact the duplicate so why was the older question marked as the duplicate?

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    $\begingroup$ The 1st question is a bit better, as it asks how to calculate max height from record on Earth. The 2nd one asks when a balloon adapted for Mars will rupture - which is less answerable. $\endgroup$ – Rory Alsop Mar 25 at 11:57
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    $\begingroup$ Just so you know, the order the questions were asked is not necessarily the determining factor in which would be closed as a duplicate. I think this is what Rory is alluding to. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Mar 25 at 12:59
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    $\begingroup$ Yes - as @called2voyage says, I voted based on how good the questions are, not which was first posted. $\endgroup$ – Rory Alsop Mar 26 at 18:18
  • $\begingroup$ @RoryAlsop if you make that an answer I will accept it $\endgroup$ – Muze Mar 26 at 18:34
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Which one of these balloons question on Mars came out first?

  1. How high could a weather balloon be used on Mars without rupturing? was asked Mar 20 at 2:40
  2. Maximum height for a Mars Ballon? was asked Mar 20 at 16:58

Where do I look for an exact timestamp?

On each post, there's an infobox on the bottom right

infobox

It's also possible to hover on the timestamp to get the more precise UTC-based timestamp.

UTC timestamp


Updated: I kept an eye on the questions and 2nd question day turned first to day 5 making question 2 the first one published.

Probably you're referring to the "Active" questions list which is ordered based on the last activity happened on that question. As of current writing:

  1. Maximum height for a Mars Ballon? was last active Mar 24 at 20:53
  2. How high could a weather balloon be used on Mars without rupturing? was last active Mar 22 at 1:39

The "Newest" one orders the questions based on their asked date instead.


Side question?: Should the second one be marked as a duplicate?

Based on reading both questions and their answers, both have an answer which states 28 km. But I'll leave the matter to this community since I'm not a regular and don't have the expertise to evaluate it.

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While often a newer question will get closed as duplicate of an older one if the older one already has good answers - if there are two open questions that are similar, the best way to approach them is to look at which gives both value to the original asker, but also to future visitors.

For example, one asking about a whole category of situations with a good answer would be preferable to keep as the master than a specific one which only asked about one subset of that master. In that case I'd close the subset one as a dupe of the wider master.

Or if one question is written much better, or has much better answers, then we may prefer that over a more careless one.

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Where do I look for an exact timestamp?

Hover your cursor over the approximate timestamp to see the precise time (to one second) in UTC. The trailing Z is short for Zulu time.

timestamp

Should the second one be marked as a duplicate?

Marking as duplicate is done by voting. If you would like to ask "Is this a duplicate" then write that out as your actual question.


Question 1 was in fact the duplicate so why was the older question marked as the duplicate?

Marking as duplicate is a Stack Exchange function to bring future readers to the best answer. It doesn't have any specific connection to the sequence of asking. "I was here first" thinking shouldn't be applied.

Similar question-asking happens once in a while. It's hard to judge in this case, both questions are pretty short and their original titles don't exactly match the questions asked in the original texts.

As always it's best to worry about getting one's questions to be clear in the beginning. I think both were written hastily and could have been written more carefully and thoughtfully, but there are two good-quality answers to this one. Closing the other one as duplicate brings future readers to those answers, so the other should stay closed until it's rewritten to ask a substantially different question that would require substantially different answers.

I was here first! and It's not fair! are unbecoming ways to view the Stack Exchange experience.

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  • $\begingroup$ @Muze Your profile says Member for 2 years, 6 months so that kind of "oops I made a mistake. Gosh I'm new at this and still learning." is stretching it. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 25 at 22:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Muze I haven't looked that closely at the two questions, I'll check them again in the morning. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 26 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Muze I've done so. However, since you've deleted your comment, you may not receive a notification from this comment. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 27 at 4:02

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